Tag Archives: visual processing

What does it mean to have a visual processing problem?

The Visual Learning Center offers 
developmental optometry & vision therapy
in Olney, Maryland, near Silver Spring.

A visual processing problem is a type of perceptual deficiency that hinders a child’s ability to make sense of information that they take in through their eyes. Reading, writing, learning and countless important everyday activities require strong visual processing skills.

Click here to watch a video about vision problems and learning.

To be able to see clearly is just the beginning, and 20-20 vision is not enough. It is the brain, not the eyes, that interprets and applies visual data. A visual processing problem occurs when there is a disruption or inefficiency in the way the brain processes information after the eyes see something.

Vision requires healthy neurological activity and communication between the eyes and the brain within a complex set of mechanisms. A visual processing problem results when this system either hasn’t developed properly or it has been damaged in some way.

Click here to download our free guide, “10 Things You Need to Know About Vision”

When a child has a visual processing disorder, they may see clearly and their eyes may function normally, but they may not have the ability effectively and efficiently interpret, categorize, remember, or associate meaning with the images and information in their brain.

Examples of visual processing problems include difficulty with visualization, visual memory, visual processing speed and accuracy,  visual-motor integration and speed, and more.

Visualization is the process of creating a mental picture in the mind. It’s what occurs when someone says to “picture this” or when you’re reading and you imagine the characters and scene in your mind. This process is fundamental to creating and associating meaning. A child with a visualization problem struggles to create that mental picture, so they are missing an important building block of learning.

Visual memory refers to the ability to accurately remember something you see. We have to remember what letters look like, what words look like, and what letters and words mean from sentence to sentence, from page to page, and from day to day. If there is a problem with visual memory, learning of the same material has to occur again and again.

Visual processing speed and accuracy involves reading words, sentences, and numbers quickly and with few errors. Children with visual processing problems tend to work slowly and make more errors in their work.

Visual-motor integration is the ability to correctly perceive visual information, process it, and move your hands or body accordingly. Visual-motor speed is the ability to efficiently integrate visual skills and motor skills for the purpose of completing a task.

Visual sequencing is the ability to tell the correct order of words, symbols, or images.

Visual figure-ground discrimination enables a child to distinguish a shape or text from the background in which it is situated. Visual discrimination is the ability to recognize the difference between similar objects, shapes, or letters, such as p and q or b and d.

Visual closure is the ability to identify an object from its parts. For example, the child might not be able to identify a car that’s missing its wheels or a word missing letters, which interferes with learning, reading, and spelling.

Visual-spatial processing refers to the ability to tell space or distance of an object, either on paper or physically. It also enables understanding of time and narrative, which factors into comprehension levels.

If your child has a visual processing problem, school, athletics, and even social interaction can be challenging. The good news is visual processing therapy with one-on-one vision training can effectively improve visual processing skills.

Signs of visual processing problems include:

  • Difficulty reading
  • Complaints of tiredness while reading
  • Losing place or skipping words while reading
  • Trouble with math or inability to make progress in math
  • Messy handwriting
  • Difficulty buttoning or zipping clothes or trouble cutting food or using scissors

Read 9 Signs Your Child May Have an Undiagnosed Vision Problem.

If you suspect your child could have a visual processing disorder, schedule a comprehensive vision exam with a developmental optometrist who specializes in functional vision care.

For visual processing therapy in Silver Spring or Olney Maryland, contact Dr. Philip Nicholson’s Visual Learning Center to schedule a comprehensive vision exam today.

Vision Therapy Helps Children Who Struggle With Visual Motor Integration

Visual-motor integration (VMI) is the function that ensures our eyes and the movement of our hands work together efficiently and smoothly. Healthy VMI coordinates and assimilates visual perception (input), visual processing (decoding), and visual output through the fine motor skill of writing.

Click here to watch a video about how vision affects learning.

When you think of hand-eye or eye-hand coordination and learning, you might think it’s only challenging for early learners fumbling to grasp and control jumbo-sized markers and crayons. Once your child seems to have the hang of holding his pencil, you may not expect visual-motor integration to significantly affect learning; but undetected deficiencies in your child’s visual-motor skills can interfere with paper-pencil work in elementary school and beyond.

Even if a child is working with an Occupational Therapist (OT) to improve motor skills, this may not address possible problems with visual perception. OTs are trained to work with children to improve and strengthen specific skills and abilities, but deficiencies in the visual processing system can interfere with a child’s ability to make progress.

Visual-motor integration includes the ability to first correctly perceive visual information as a form, such as a letter, and then correctly replicate it. In early elementary years, children with delayed or disordered VMI have trouble with seemingly simple tasks such as copying their name or even copying basic shapes–what they write or draw does not look like the word or shape they are using for a guide.

Other signs of visual-motor dysfunction include:

  • Messy handwriting
  • Poor test taking, despite knowing the material
  • Trouble gripping or repeatedly re-gripping pencil
  • Difficulty writing within lines
  • Excessive erasing
  • Slow to complete assignments
  • Leaning close to paper
  • Lots of omissions and errors in work

Click here for 9 signs your child may have an undiagnosed vision problem.

While we tend to appreciate the importance of high-functioning visual-motor integration for activities such as sports, art, or music, research findings demonstrate a notable correlation between visual-motor integration skills and academic performance in writing, spelling, reading, and math. Even when taking learning disabilities and overall cognitive abilities into account, poor visual-motor integration has been shown to impact standardized test scores. Low VMI skills in Kindergarten have also been shown to predict reading abilities in middle school.

For students with visual motor deficiencies, coordinating their visual perception, visual processing, and fine motor output is so challenging that they have significant difficulty with tasks such as copying information from the board or from a book onto paper. Because of this, learning occurs more slowly and overall performance is affected. They have trouble following instructions, completing worksheets and other written assignments, and writing answers on tests. They know the material being covered, but putting pencil to paper is not as easy for them as it is for their peers.

If you suspect your child may be struggling with visual motor integration, the first step is to schedule a functional vision exam with an optometrist trained in developmental vision care. Once diagnosed, the good news is, an individualized vision therapy program can result in noticeable improvement in a relatively short period of time.

If you are in the Olney or Silver Spring, MD area, contact Dr. Philip Nicholson’s Visual Learning Center today for an appointment today.

Philip Nicholson, O.D.

Q&A: How is your program different from other providers of vision therapy?

When a child struggles with vision problems, such as deficiencies in eye focusing, eye teaming, eye tracking, or visual processing, the first step to getting help is diagnosis.

Many Montgomery County families come to the Visual Learning Center in our Olney, Maryland office because their child has been having difficulty with reading, writing, or behavioral problems in school. Often, learning disabilities, dyslexia, and attention deficit disorders have been ruled out, or traditional attempts to help the child improve in school are not working.

After an initial assessment, we encourage parents to schedule an appointment for a comprehensive visual analysis, which takes up to two hours and includes a written report and follow-up consultation, and a unique treatment plan individualized for each child.

What sets our vision therapy treatment plan apart from other approaches is that it is based in the best scientific research available in the field of vision and learning, and our methods are continually modified to incorporate new scientific data to achieve the best results.

Our vision therapy program is a highly targeted treatment program designed to correct visual-motor and perceptual-cognitive deficiencies. Vision therapy sessions include procedures designed to enhance the brain’s ability to properly control the whole vision system. At the Visual Learning Center, our vision therapy exercises target and train visual skills that are most likely to have a meaningful impact on learning performance and a child’s academic abilities.

Each child is treated individually, on a one-on-one basis, to achieve significant results quickly and allow for immediate feedback. Both positive reinforcement and gentle and direct error correction encourages the child to feel greater confidence early in the process and make progressive improvements throughout the vision therapy program. One of the first things you will notice, is that your child’s self-esteem will improve as he sees the difference in his performance.

The vision therapy exercises are designed with a discouraged young student’s needs in mind. Children work through sequenced procedures that aim to challenge–not bore or frustrate them–unlike their school work, which carries negative associations for them. Instead, the activities are designed to help your child practice and develop new skills in a non-academic way that does not remind them of their difficulty with schoolwork. Because of this approach, newly developed visual skills will become habitual in a fun and safe manner, and then your child will be able to apply his new skills to his academics automatically, and with a high level of retention.

Something else that sets our program apart is that we encourage parental involvement. The program requires practice outside of in-office sessions. Practicing at home provides an opportunity for cost-effective repetitious procedures and helps your child to transfer learned skills to everyday activities. But what parents tell us they enjoy most about their participation is that it often mends the parent-student relationship. We understand that homework wars and punishments for getting in trouble at school can strain your interactions with your child, so we are delighted to play a part in making a positive impact on your relationship.

Overall, vision therapy at the Visual Learning Center produces invaluable results when considering committed effort, time, and finances. I chose to become an optometrist who specializes in developmental and functional vision care because I struggled with vision problems as a child, and I can attribute my success as a student to the results of vision therapy. Click here to read some of the vision therapy results and success stories our patients have experienced.

To schedule an appointment for a comprehensive vision assessment and learn more about our vision therapy program in Olney, MD, call 301-570-4611, or complete this form.