Philip Nicholson, O.D.

Q&A: Why did the other eye doctor we took our child to say he didn’t see anything wrong with his eyes?

Parents often contact us at the Visual Learning Center confused, wondering how their child could possibly have a vision problem when their family eye doctor did not indicate that anything was wrong with the child’s eyes.

We understand that, as a parent, you only want the best for your child and you rely on professionals to detect problems and advise you on the best course of action to care for your child.

Sometimes families express frustration with their eye doctor, wondering how the visual processing problem that — as it turns out — is causing so much disruption in their child’s ability to learn, could have been missed. They question whether earlier intervention and vision therapy at a younger age could have set the child up for better success at school.

The simple answer is that the particular eye doctor who examined your child is probably not a developmental optometrist. Though he or she is an O.D., just like I am, that doctor has not been trained in developmental diagnosis and vision therapy.

Routine eye or vision exams check the health of the eyes and the need for glasses. Eye doctors that specialize in surgery or disease treatment will likely not be able to diagnose functional problems, related to learning. This is simply not their area of expertise.

If you are a parent who suspects that your child might be struggling with a learning-related vision problem, have a conversation with your eye doctor to make sure your provider will look beyond ‘20/20 vision.’ If your eye doctor does not test using specific methods, vision-related learning problems will not be diagnosed and your child may continue to have functional vision problems.

Here is a helpful list of questions to ask your eye doctor:

  • Do you test for and correct accommodation (focusing) facility with +2 and –2 diopter flippers? Do you test for and correct lateral vergence facility (lateral eye alignment and speed) using prism flippers with 3 diopters base in and 12 diopters base out?
  • Do you test for and correct vertical vergence ranges (vertical eye alignment) using single prisms base up and down?
  • Do you test for and correct eye movement while the child is reading or answering questions that require comprehension? (using Visigraph infrared monitoring devices or similar equipment)? Eye movement analysis while simply following a moving target is not an accurate measurement of eye movement skills used while reading as this measures pursuit movements and not saccadic movements used while reading.
  • Do you test for visual perceptual or visual processing skills like visual discrimination, visualization or visual memory?

Feel free to print this off and take it with you to your appointment.

And if your family lives in the Olney, MD or Silver Spring, MD area, and you are interested in having your child tested for vision problems that may be interfering with their learning, contact our office and schedule an appointment to determine if your child might significantly benefit from treatment of learning related vision problems.

Philip Nicholson, O.D.

One thought on “Q&A: Why did the other eye doctor we took our child to say he didn’t see anything wrong with his eyes?

  1. Hello there! This post couldn’t be written any better!
    Reading through this article reminds me of my previous roommate!

    He always kept talking about this. I will forward this article to him.
    Pretty sure he will have a great read. Many thanks for sharing!

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