Does homework in your household drag on for hours? Convergence insufficiency could be the cause

If your child spends hours completing homework each evening, your initial frustration might be with his teacher. You may complain that too much homework is being assigned and worry that the school is to blame for interfering with family time, play time, or outdoor and extracurricular activities; but over time, you eventually realize that your child is taking much longer to complete his homework than his peers.

You know that your child is bright, so why is he struggling to complete homework in a timely manner? You could suspect a learning disability or attention deficit disorder, but your child could actually have a vision disorder, even if he was found to have “20/20” eyesight during a vision screening at school or an exam by your family’s eye doctor.

Vision disorders and poor visual processing skills are sometimes to blame for “homework wars” and poor performance in the classroom.

As a parent, it is important to pay close attention to your child’s symptoms. You might be tempted to dismiss complaints as excuses and urge your child to push forward and try harder. However, if your child has a vision problem such as convergence insufficiency, his symptoms could be presenting significant challenges to performing well on school assignments.

Convergence–the ability to aim ones eyes at a near distance–is a required skill for reading and other schoolwork. Children with a healthy visual system are able to aim their eyes naturally and easily.

Convergence insufficiency is a medical condition in which the brain has trouble accurately, efficiently, and comfortably coordinating the eye muscles to see properly for a prolonged period of time at reading distance.

If your child often complains of headaches or claims that his eyes hurt, feel like they are pulling, tired, or uncomfortable, this could be a sign of convergence insufficiency. Difficulty concentrating or remembering what he has read could be symptoms as well. A child may also complain of double vision, or say that that words float, swim, or move in and out of focus. He may read slowly, lose his place, or read the same line more than once.

If your child is having difficulty in school or completing homework, and you notice any of these red flags, schedule an evaluation with a functional or developmental optometrist, trained to detect and treat learning-related vision problems, as soon as possible. If diagnosed with a vision problem such as convergence insufficiency, the good news is vision therapy can treat and improve your child’s convergence problem significantly and quickly.

If you are in the Olney, MD or Silver Spring, MD area, contact the Visual Learning Center today to schedule a comprehensive evaluation with Dr. Philip Nicholson and his staff.

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